Early America and the Right to Life

 

From the Central Montana Pro-Life Group

Without the "Right to Life" all other rights are meaningless.

In 1973 the Supreme Court outlawed the founders' desire to "secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity" by declaring that the unborn child has no right to life and since then over 50,000,000 lives have been innocently taken and first rights revoked by abortion.

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Quotes from the Founding Fathers

John Adams signed the Declaration of Independence, 2nd President of US

Statesmen, my dear Sir, may plan and speculate for liberty, but it is Religion and Morality alone, which can establish the Principles upon which Freedom can securely stand. If it be the pleasure of Heaven that my country shall require the poor offering of my life, the victim shall be ready, at the appointed hour of sacrifice, come when that hour may. But while I do live, let me have a country and that a free country
Written June 21, 1776

All that I have, and all that I am, and all that I hope in this life, I am now ready here to stake upon it. And I leave off as I began, that live or die, survive or perish, I am for the Declaration. It is my living sentiment, and by the blessing of God it shall e my dying sentiment. Independence now and Independence forever.
Speech to the delegates of the Continental Congress 7/1/1776 full text

It may be the will of heaven that America shall suffer calamities still more wasting and distresses yet more dreadful. If this is the be the case, it will have this good effect, at least: it will inspire us with many virtues which we have not, and correct many errors, follies and vices, which threaten to disturb, dishonor and destroy us…The furnace of affliction produces refinements in states, as well as in individuals
7/3/1776 after approval of Declaration of Independence

The second day of July, 1776, will be the most memorable epoch in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary Festival…..You will think me transported with enthusiasm, but I am not. I am well aware of the toil and blood and treasure, that it will cost to maintain this Declaration, and support and defend these States. Yet through all the gloom I can see the rays of ravishing light and glory. I can see that the end is worth more than all the means; that posterity will triumph in that day’s transaction, even though we may regret it, which I trust in God we shall not. 7/3/1776 letter to his wife Abigail

When it was first perceived, in early times, that no middle course for America remained between unlimited submission to a foreign legislature and a total independence of its claims, men of reflection were less apprehensive of danger from the formidable power of fleets and armies they must determine to resist than from those contests and dissensions which would certainly arise concerning the forms of government to be instituted over the whole and over the parts of this extensive country. Relying, however, on the purity of their intentions, the justice of their cause, and the integrity and intelligence of the people under an overruling Providence which had so signally protected this country from the first, the representatives of this nation…not only broke to pieces the chains which were forging and the rod of iron that was lifted up, but frankly cut asunder the ties which had bound them, and launched into an ocean of uncertainty….. With this great example before me, with the sense and spirit, the faith and honor, the duty and interest, of the same American people pledged to support the Constitution of the United States, I entertain no doubt of its continuance in all its energy, and my mind is prepared without hesitation to lay myself under the most solemn obligations to support it to the utmost of my power. And may that Being who is supreme over all, the Patron of Order, the Fountain of Justice, and the Protector in all ages of the world of virtuous liberty, continue His blessing upon this nation and its Government and give it all possible success and duration consistent with the ends of His providence, Inaugural Address 3/4/1797 full text

We have no government armed with the power capable of contending with human passions, unbridled by morality and true religion. Our constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other. President John Adams addressing the military 1798

As no truth is more clearly taught in the Volumes of Inspiration, nor any more fully demonstrated by the experience of all ages, than that a deep sense and a due acknowledgment of the growing providence of a Supreme Being and of the accountableness of men to Him as the searchers of hearts and righteous distributer f rewards and punishments are conducive equally to the happiness of individuals and to the well-being of communities…I have thought proper to recommend, and I hereby recommend accordingly, that Thursday, the twenty-fifth day of April next, be observed throughout the United States of America as a day of solemn humiliation, fasting, and prayer….President John Adams calls for a National Fast Day 3/6/1799

Samuel Adams known as “Father of the American Revolution;” instigated the Boston Tea Party, signed the Declaration of Independence, called for the First Continental Congress and served as a member of Congress until 1781

Among the Natural Rights of the Colonists are these First, a Right to Life, Secondly to Liberty, thirdly to Property, together with the Right to support and defend them in the best manner they can..Those are evident branches of, rather than deductions from the Duty of Self Preservation, commonly called the first Law of Nature. All Men have a right to remain in a State of Nature as long as they please: And in case of intolerable Oppression, Civil or Religious, to leave the Society they belong to, and enter into another…The Rights of the Colonists and a List of Violations of Rights Adopted by the Town of Boston November 20, 1772 full text

If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen! …written August 1, 1776
Full text

We have this day restored the Sovereign to Whom all men ought to be obedient. He reigns in heaven and from the rising to the setting of the sun, let His Kingdom come.
as the Declaration of Independence was being signed 1776

Neither the wisest constitution nor the wisest laws will secure the liberty and happiness of a people whose manners are universally corrupt. He therefore is the truest friend to the liberty of his country who tries most to promote its virtue and who, so far as his power and influence extend, will not suffer a man to be chosen into any office of power and trust who is not a wise and virtuous man…The sum of all is, if we would most truly enjoy this gift of Heaven, let us become a virtuous people.
letter to James Warren 2/12/1779

In the supposed state of nature, al men are equally bound by the laws of nature , or to speak more properly, the laws of the Creator—They are imprinted by th finger of God on the heart of man. Thou shall do no injury to thy neighbor, is the voice of nature and reason, and it is confirmed by written revelation…I conceive we cannot better express ourselves than by humbly supplicating the Supreme Ruler of the World.
Addressing the Legislature when he became governor of Massachusetts

Benjamin Franklin signed the Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, and US Constitution

God helps them that help themselves June 1736

In 1755 (), “Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.”
Pennsylvania Assembly: Reply to the Governor, Nov 11, 1755

Work as if you were to live 100 years; pray as if you were to die tomorrow May 1757

Freedom is not a gift bestowed upon us by other men, but a right that belongs to us by the laws of God and nature

Search others for their virtues, thy self for thy vices

Whoever shall introduce into public affairs the principles of primitive Christianity will change the face of the world letter to the French ministry 3/1778

I have lived, Sir, a long time, and the longer I live, the more convincing proofs I see of this truth—that God Governs in the affairs of men. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without His notice, is it probable that an empire can rise without His aid? We have been assured, Sir, in the Sacred Writings, that ‘expect the Lord build the House, they labor in vain that build it.” I firmly believe this; and I also believe that without his concurring aid we shall succeed in this political building no better than the Builders of Babel…I therefore beg leave to move—that henceforth prayers imploring the assistance of Heaven, and its blessing on our deliberations, be held in this Assembly every morning before we proceed to business, and that one or more of the clergy of this city be requested to officiate in that service.
6/28/1787 portion of speech to the Constitutional Convention full text

To make the poor uncomfortable in their poverty, is the best way to help them overcome their poverty.

We either stand together or, we will surely hang separately.”

Freedom is not a gift bestowed upon us by other men, but a right that belongs to us by the laws of God and Nature
“Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote

Resistance to tyranny is obedience to God.

John Hancock first member of the Continental Congress to sign the Declaration of Independence

In circumstances, dark as these, it becomes us, as Men and Christians, to reflect that, while every prudent Measure should be taken to ward off the impending Judgments…All confidence must be withheld from the Means we use; and reposed only o that GOD who rules in the Armies of Heaven, and without whose Blessing the best human counsels are but Foolishness—and all created power vanity..
4/15/1775 declared a Day of Public Humiliation, Fasting and Prayer as President of Provincial Congress

Patrick Henry orator, leader, member of the Continental Congress
An appeal to arms and the God of hosts is all that is left us. But we shall not fight our battle alone. There is a just God that presides over the destinies of
nations… The battle sir, is not of the strong alone. Is life so dear or peace so sweet as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it almighty God. I know not what course others may take, but as for me, give me liberty, or give me death.
Spoken to the Second Virginia Convention 3/23/1775 full text

John Jay first chief justice of US Supreme Court, president of Continental Congress; coauthored the Federalist Papers
The Bible will also inform them that our gracious Creator has provided for us a Redeemer, in whom all the nations of the earth shall be blessed; that this Redeemer has made atonement “for the sins of the whole world,” and thereby reconciling the Divine justice with the Divine mercy has opened a way for our redemption and salvation, and that these inestimable benefits are of the free gift and grace of God, not of our deserving, nor in our power to deserve.
Addressed the American Bible Society as its president 3/13/1824

Thomas Jefferson 3rd president of US; wrote the Declaration of Independence

When injustice becomes law, Resistance becomes duty

It is as useless to argue with those who have renounced the use and authority of reason
as to administer medication to the dead

The two enemies of the people are criminals and governments. So let us tie the second down with the chains of the Constitution so that the second will not become the legal version of the first.”

“Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not

When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Natures God entitles them…We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal. That they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness…We, Therefore the Representatives of the Unites States of American, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions…And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes, and our Sacred Honor. Portions of the Declaration of Independence 7/4/1776 full text

I will compress [the essential principles of our Government] within the narrowest compass they will bear, stating the general principle, but not all its limitations Equal and exact justice to all men, of whatever state or persuasion, religious or political, peace, commerce, and honest friendship with all nations, entangling alliances with none, the support of the State governments in all their rights, as the most competent administrations for our domestic concerns and the surest bulwarks against anti-republican tendencies, the preservation of the General Government in its whole constitutional vigor, as the sheet anchor of our peace at home and safety abroad; a jealous care of the right of election by the people, a mild and safe corrective of abuses…a well disciplined militia…the supremacy of the civil over the military authority, the honest payment of our debts and sacred preservation of the public faith…freedom of religion, freedom of the press, and freedom of person under the protection of the habeas corups, and trial by juries impartially selected. These principles form the bright constellation which has gone before us and guided our steps through an age of revolution and reformation. The wisdom of our sages and blood of our heroes have been devoted to their attainment. They should be creed of our political faith, the text of civic instruction, the touchstone by which to try the services of those we trust, and should we wander from them in moments fo error or of alarm, let us hasten to retrace our steps and to regain the road which alone leads to peace, liberty, and safety… from first inaugural address 1801 full text

God who gave us life gave us liberty. And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are of the Gift of God? That they are not to be violated but with His wrath? Indeed, I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just; that His justice cannot sleep forever.
Thomas Jefferson: (engraved on the Jefferson Memorial in Washington D.C)

James Madison known as “Chief Architect of the Constitution;” 4th president of US

We have staked the whole future of American civilization, not upon the power of government, far from it. We have staked the future of all our political institutions upon the capacity of mankind for self-government; upon the capacity of each and all of us to govern ourselves, to control ourselves, to sustain ourselves, according to the Ten Commandments of God.1778

The two Houses of the National Legislature having by a joint resolution expressed their desire that in the present time of public calamity and war a day may be recommended to be observed by the people of the United States as a day of public humiliation and fasting and of prayer to Almighty God for the safety and welfare of these states.” 1814

The belief in a God All Powerful wise and good, is so essential to the moral order of the World and to the happiness of man, that arguments which enforce it cannot be drawn from too many sources nor adapted with too much solicitude to the different characters and capacities to be impressed with it.” **In a letter to Frederick Beasley 11/20/1825: “

Thomas Paine wrote inspiratory revolutionary pamphlets “Common Sense” The Age of Reason, The Crisis

These are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country, but he that stands it now , deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered, yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly…I have as little superstition in me as any man living, but my secret opinion has ever been, and still is, that God Almighty will not give up a people to military destruction, or leave them unsupported to perish, who have so earnestly and so repeatedly sought to avoid the calamities of war, by ever decent method which wisdom could invent.
12/23/1776 a portion of his pamphlet “The Crisis” full text

I die in perfect composure and resignation to the will of my Creator God. Last words

Gouverneur Morris writer of final draft of the US Constitution; originator of phrase “we the people”

Religion is the only solid basis of good morals; therefore, education should teach the precepts of religion and the duties of man toward God

Benjamin Rush physician, signer of Declaration of Independence

The only foundation for…a republic is to be laid in Religion. Without this there can be no virtue, and without virtue there can be no liberty, and liberty is the object and life of all republican governments. 1798 after the adoption of the Constitution

George Washington; 1st President of US; Commander in Chief of Continental Army

But by the all-powerful dispensations of Providence, I have been protected beyond all human probability or expectation; for I had four bullets through my coat, and two horses shot under me, yet escaped unhurt, although death was leveling my companions on every side of me.
7/18/1755 letter written to his brother after the Battle at the Monongahela

It having pleased the Almighty Ruler of the universe to defend the cause of the United American States, and finally to raise up a powerful friend among the princes of the earth, to establish our liberty and independence upon a lasting foundation it becomes us to set apart a day for gratefully acknowledging the divine goodness, and celebrating the important event, which we owe to His divine interposition. 5/5/1778 Valley Forge Headquarters upon receiving news that France joined the colonies full text

No people can be bound to acknowledge and adore the Invisible Hand with conducts the affairs of men more than the people of the United States…Every step by which they have advanced to the character of an independent nation seems to have been distinguished by some token of providential agency….We ought to be no less persuaded that the propitious smiles of Heaven can never be expected on a nation that disregards the eternal rules of order and right which Heaven itself has ordained. And since the preservation of the sacred fire of liberty and the destiny of the republican model of government are justly considered as deeply, perhaps as finally staked, on the experiment entrusted to the hands of the American people
George Washington in his inaugural address 4/30/1789 full text

It is in an especial manner our duty as a people, with devout reverence and affectionate gratitude, to acknowledge our many and great obligations to Almighty God, and to implore Him to continue and confirm the blessings we experienced…full text
opening paragraph of his second National Thanksgiving Proclamation 1/1/1795

Interwoven as is the love of liberty with every ligament of your hearts, no recommendation of mine is necessary to fortify, or confirm, the attachment……Without looking forward to an extremity of this kind the common and continual mischiefs of the spirit of party are sufficient to make it the interest and duty of a wise people to discourage and restrain it. It serves always to distract the Public Councils, and enfeeble the Public administration . It agitates the Community with ill-founded jealousies and false alarms, kindles the animosity of one par against another, foments occasionally, riot and insurrection. It opens the door to foreign influence and corruption, which find a facilitated access to the government itself through the channels for party passions. This the policy and the will of one country are subjected to the policy and will of another. …Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, Religion and Morality are indispensable supports…In vain would that man claim the tribute of Patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of Men and Citizen…Reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle…Observe good faith and justice toward all Nations, cultivate peace and harmony with all Religion and Morality enjoin this conduct; and can it be that good policy does not equally enjoin it…A passionate attachment of one Nation for another produces a variety of evils. George Washington in his farewell speech 1796 full text

Noah Webster largely responsible for writing Article I, section 8 of US Constitution; published American Dictionary of the English Language

11/1828 containing the greatest number of biblical definitions given in any secular volume

Education is useless without the Bible.

The Bible was America’s basic text book in all fields.

God’s Word, contained in the Bible, has furnished all necessary rules to direct our conduct

John Witherspoon signer of the Declaration of Independence, member of the Continental Congress; clergyman, president of Princeton College

It is in the man of piety and inward principle, that we may expect to find the uncorrupted patriot, the useful citizen, and the invincible soldier.—God grant that in America true religion and civil liberty may be inseparable and that the unjust attempts to destroy the one, may in the issue tend to the establishment and support of both. Sermon to Princeton College 1776 full text

While we give praise to God, the Supreme disposer of all events, for His interposition on our behalf, let us guard against the dangerous error of trusting in, or boasting of, an arm of flesh….If your cause is just, if your principles are pure, and if your conduct is prudent, you need not fear the multitude of opposing hosts,,,.Whoever is an avowed enemy of God, I scruple not [do not hesitate] to call him an enemy of his country.
in a speech at the College of New Jersey (Princeton) 5/17/1776

The fate of the signers of the Declaration of Independence
Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured before they died.
Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned. Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army; another had two sons captured.
Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or hardships of the Revolutionary War.
They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor.
What kind of men were they?
Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists. Eleven were merchants; nine were farmers and large plantation owners; men of means, well educated, but they signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the penalty would be death if they were captured.
Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the British Navy. He sold his home and properties to pay his debts, and died in rags.
Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British that he was forced to move his family almost constantly. He served in the Congress without pay, and his family was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him, and poverty was his reward.
Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer, Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.
At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that the British General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General George Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed, and Nelson died bankrupt.
Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed. The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months.
John Hart was driven from his wife’s bedside as she was dying. Their 13 children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill were laid to waste. For more than a year he lived in forests and caves, returning home to find his wife dead and his children vanished. So, take a few minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and silently thank these patriots. It’s not much to ask for the price they paid.

Give Me Liberty Or Give Me Death
Patrick Henry, March 23, 1775.
No man thinks more highly than I do of the patriotism, as well as abilities, of the very worthy gentlemen who have just addressed the House. But different men often see the same subject in different lights; and, therefore, I hope it will not be thought disrespectful to those gentlemen if, entertaining as I do opinions of a character very opposite to theirs, I shall speak forth my sentiments freely and without reserve. This is no time for ceremony. The questing before the House is one of awful moment to this country. For my own part, I consider it as nothing less than a question of freedom or slavery; and in proportion to the magnitude of the subject ought to be the freedom of the debate. It is only in this way that we can hope to arrive at truth, and fulfill the great responsibility which we hold to God and our country. Should I keep back my opinions at such a time, through fear of giving offense, I should consider myself as guilty of treason towards my country, and of an act of disloyalty toward the Majesty of Heaven, which I revere above all earthly kings.
Mr. President, it is natural to man to indulge in the illusions of hope. We are apt to shut our eyes against a painful truth, and listen to the song of that siren till she transforms us into beasts. Is this the part of wise men, engaged in a great and arduous struggle for liberty? Are we disposed to be of the number of those who, having eyes, see not, and, having ears, hear not, the things which so nearly concern their temporal salvation? For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst, and to provide for it.
I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience. I know of no way of judging of the future but by the past. And judging by the past, I wish to know what there has been in the conduct of the British ministry for the last ten years to justify those hopes with which gentlemen have been pleased to solace themselves and the House. Is it that insidious smile with which our petition has been lately received? Trust it not, sir; it will prove a snare to your feet. Suffer not yourselves to be betrayed with a kiss. Ask yourselves how this gracious reception of our petition comports with those warlike preparations which cover our waters and darken our land. Are fleets and armies necessary to a work of love and reconciliation? Have we shown ourselves so unwilling to be reconciled that force must be called in to win back our love? Let us not deceive ourselves, sir. These are the implements of war and subjugation; the last arguments to which kings resort. I ask gentlemen, sir, what means this martial array, if its purpose be not to force us to submission? Can gentlemen assign any other possible motive for it? Has Great Britain any enemy, in this quarter of the world, to call for all this accumulation of navies and armies? No, sir, she has none. They are meant for us: they can be meant for no other. They are sent over to bind and rivet upon us those chains which the British ministry have been so long forging. And what have we to oppose to them? Shall we try argument? Sir, we have been trying that for the last ten years. Have we anything new to offer upon the subject? Nothing. We have held the subject up in every light of which it is capable; but it has been all in vain. Shall we resort to entreaty and humble supplication? What terms shall we find which have not been already exhausted? Let us not, I beseech you, sir, deceive ourselves. Sir, we have done everything that could be done to avert the storm which is now coming on. We have petitioned; we have remonstrated; we have supplicated; we have prostrated ourselves before the throne, and have implored its interposition to arrest the tyrannical hands of the ministry and Parliament. Our petitions have been slighted; our remonstrances have produced additional violence and insult; our supplications have been disregarded; and we have been spurned, with contempt, from the foot of the throne! In vain, after these things, may we indulge the fond hope of peace and reconciliation. There is no longer any room for hope. If we wish to be free– if we mean to preserve inviolate those inestimable privileges for which we have been so long contending–if we mean not basely to abandon the noble struggle in which we have been so long engaged, and which we have pledged ourselves never to abandon until the glorious object of our contest shall be obtained–we must fight! I repeat it, sir, we must fight! An appeal to arms and to the God of hosts is all that is left us!
They tell us, sir, that we are weak; unable to cope with so formidable an adversary. But when shall we be stronger? Will it be the next week, or the next year? Will it be when we are totally disarmed, and when a British guard shall be stationed in every house? Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot? Sir, we are not weak if we make a proper use of those means which the God of nature hath placed in our power. The millions of people, armed in the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as that which we possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us. Besides, sir, we shall not fight our battles alone. There is a just God who presides over the destinies of nations, and who will raise up friends to fight our battles for us. The battle, sir, is not to the strong alone; it is to the vigilant, the active, the brave. Besides, sir, we have no election. If we were base enough to desire it, it is now too late to retire from the contest. There is no retreat but in submission and slavery! Our chains are forged! Their clanking may be heard on the plains of Boston! The war is inevitable–and let it come! I repeat it, sir, let it come.
It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry, Peace, Peace– but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! The next gale that sweeps from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms! Our brethren are already in the field! Why stand we here idle? What is it that gentlemen wish? What would they have? Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!

THE MAYFLOWER COMPACT
First foundation for written law in the New World 11/11/1620

In the name of God, Amen. We, whose names are underwritten, the Loyal Subjects of our dread Sovereign Lord, King James, by the Grace of God, of England, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Faith

Having undertaken for the Glory of God, and Advancement of the Christian Faith, and the Honour of our King and Country, a voyage to plant the first colony in the northern parts of Virginia, do by these presents, solemn and mutually in the Presence of God and one of another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil Body Politick, for our better Ordering and Preservation, and Furtherance of the Ends aforesaid; And by Virtue hereof to enact, constitute, and frame, such just and equal Laws, Ordinances, Acts, Constitutions and Offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the General good of the Colony, unto which we promise all due submission and obedience.

In Witness whereof we have hereunto subscribed our names at Cape Cod the eleventh of November, in the Reign of our Sovereign Lord, King James of England, France and Ireland, the eighteenth, and of Scotland the fifty0fourth Anno Domini 1620
Dr. Annie’s Letters to the Editor Regarding the Christian Foundation of the United States

The Christian Foundation of the United States

Evidence abounds in enormous volumes (such as our national archives) that the United States was founded as a Christian nation. From the Mayflower Compact of 1620, our first great government document, to the Declaration of Independence of 1776 and the US Constitution of 1787 reference and appeal to God the Creator and Jesus Christ his son are
throughout these documents and the writings of our nation’s founders. According to the Mayflower Compact, the purpose of the voyage to America was the “glory of God, and advancement of the Christian faith…”

The cultural trend of a nation is reflected in education. Harvard (founded 1636), Princeton (1746), and Yale (1701) were founded with the purpose of promoting the Bible and Christianity as the main end of study and purpose in life. Princeton College’s first president, Jonathan Dickinson declared, “Cursed be all that learning that is contrary to the cross of Christ.” Until 1902, every president of Princeton was a minister.

Samuel Adams, a Christian, is known as the Father of the American Revolution, formed committees for colonist unity, instigated the Boston Tea party, signed the Declaration of Independence, called for the first Continental Congress and served it until 1781. In the Rights of the Colonists in 1772, Sam Adams wrote: “The right to freedom being the gift of the Almighty…The rights of the colonists as Christians…may be best understood by carefully studying the institution of The Great Law Giver and Head of the Christian Church which are to be found clearly written and promulgated in the New Testament.” As the Declaration of Independence was being signed, Samuel Adams declared: “We have this day restored the Sovereign to Whom all men ought to be obedient. He reigns in heaven and from the rising to the setting of the sun, let His kingdom come.” 2/12/1779 Sam Adams wrote: “If virtue and knowledge are diffused among the people, they will never be enslaved. This will be their great security…Neither the wisest constitution nor the wisest laws will secure the liberty and happiness of a people whose manners are universally corrupt…The sum of all is, if we would most truly enjoy this gift of Heaven, let us become a Virtuous people.” Sam Adams concept that our rights come from God and our need to obey God’s laws in order to be blessed and that religion is necessary for morals, is common in the writings of our other founders. Our second president, John Adams stated :June 21, 1776: “Statesmen, my dear Sir, may plan and speculate for liberty, but it is Religion and Morality alone, which can establish the Principles upon which Freedom can securely stand. The only foundation of a free Constitution is pure Virtue, and if this cannot be inspired into our People in a greater Measure, than they have it now, they may change their Rulers and the forms of Government, but they will not obtain a lasting liberty.” In his 10/11/1798 address to the military, John Adams said: “Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to government of any other.” He also said, “The Christian religion is, above all the Religions that ever prevailed or existed in ancient of modern times, the religion of Wisdom, Virtue, Equity, and Humanity.” Gouverneur Morris writer of the final draft of the Constitution, head of the Committee on Style and originator of the phrase, “We the people of the United States.” “religion is the only solid basis of good morals; therefore education should teach the precepts of religion, and the duties of man toward God.” Benjamin Rush physician, signer of Declaration of Independence in 1798 declared: The only foundation for a republic is to be laid in Religion. Without this there can be no virtue, and without virtue there can be no liberty, and liberty is the object and life of all republican governments.
“An appeal to arms and the God of hosts is all that is left us. But we shall not fight our battle alone. There is a just God that presides over the destinies of nations. The battle sir, is not of the strong alone. Is life so dear or peace so sweet as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it almighty God. I know not what course others may take, but as for me, give me liberty, or give me death.” Patrick Henry 1775 James Madison stated in 1778: “We have staked the whole future of American civilization, not upon the power of government, far from it. We have staked the future of all our political institutions upon the capacity of mankind for self-government; upon the capacity of each and all of us to govern ourselves, to control ourselves, to sustain ourselves, according to the Ten Commandments of God.” Engraved on the Jefferson Memorial in Washington D.C is Thomas Jefferson’s famous quote: “God who gave us life gave us liberty. And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are of the Gift of God? That they are not to be violated but with His wrath? Indeed, I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just; that His justice cannot sleep forever.”
All the state constitutions refer to God, and most refer to Jesus Christ. Many states, such as the State of Delaware constitution required for a person to serve in state congress they had to “profess faith in God the Father, and in Jesus Christ His only Son, and in the Holy Ghost, one God…” and had to acknowledge “the holy scriptures of the Old and New Testament to be given by divine inspiration.” That was written by George Read a signer of the Declaration of Independence and US Constitution
A common theme among the founders was that resisting tyranny was the obligation of Christians. John Hancock stated in 1774 “Resistance to tyranny becomes the Christian and social duty of each individual…Continue steadfast, and with a proper sense of your dependence on God, nobly defend those rights which heaven gave, and no man ought to take from us.” Ben Franklin’s recommended motto for the US: “Rebellion to tyrants is obedience to God.”

Other founders, such as Samuel Chase (signer of the Declaration of Independence, appointed Justice of the US Supreme Court by George Washington) were more specific in saying that Christianity was the established religion of this country: “By our form of government, the Christian religion is the established religion; and all sects and denominations of Christians are placed upon the same equal footing, and are equally entitled to protection in their religious liberty.” Many other founders, with urgency, stated our need for repentance.

Many framers and signers of the Declaration of Independence and US Constitution were Christian ministers and presidents of Bible societies who promoted urgent distribution of Bibles to the public. James Kent premier jurist in the development of the legal practice in the United States. “Whatever strokes at the root of Christianity tends manifestly to the dissolution of civil government…We are a Christian people, and the morality of the country is deeply engrafted upon Christianity, and not upon the doctrines or worship of those imposters (other religions)..Christianity in its enlarged sense, as a religion revealed and taught in the Bible, is part and parcel of the law of the land. John Jay 1st Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court, member of Continental Congress, served as president of the Continental Congress, President ot two Bible Societies. He wrote 10/12/1816 “Providence has given to our people the choice of their rulers, and it is the duty , as well as the privilege and interest of our Christian nation to select and prefer Christians for their rulers.”

It is clear from their writings, that some of the founders were more tolerant of other religions and Christian denominations than others. Charles Cotesworth Pinckney signer of US Constitution, delegate to Constitutional Convention, formed the Constitution of the State of South Carolina: “That all persons and religious societies who acknowledge that there is one God, and a future sate of rewards and punishments, and that God is publicly to be worshipped, shall be freely tolerated…That all denominations of Christians in this State demeaning themselves peaceably and faithfully, shall enjoy equal religious and civil privileges. God being the source of courage and resolve in the battle, that was a common theme. For Example, 30 year old Josiah Quincy, American Revolutionary patriot, lawyer, and orator of freedom; in response to the 1774 closing of the Boston harbor by the British” “Blandishments will not fascinate us, nor will threats of a halter intimidate. For, under God we are determined that wheresoever, whensoever or howsoever we shall be called to make our exit, we will die free men.”
Roger Sherman American Revolutionary patriot, politician and jurist, who was the only one of the Founding Fathers to sign all four of the major founding documents: The articles of Association 1774, the Declaration of Independence 1776, the Articles of Confederation 1777, and the Constitution of the US 1787. He served on the committee that drafted the Declaration of Independence, was a member of the Continental Congress and made 138 speeches at the CC, On his tomb read: “He ever adorned the profession of Christianity which he made in youth; and, distinguished through life for public usefulness, died in the prospect of a blessed immortality.” George Washington would regularly ask petitions and supplications be granted “through Jesus Christ, our Lord,” and his two National Day of Thanksgiving Proclamations were to Almighty God.

The Declaration of Independence mentions in the first paragraph that It was “God” that entitled the United States to separate from Great Britain. In the first line of the second paragraph, the Declaration states that it is the “Creator” that gives us certain inalienable rights. After the list of grievances against King George, the last paragraph of the Declaration appeals to the “Supreme Judge of the World,” and “reliance on the protection of Divine Providence.”

The Articles of Confederation refers to the “Great Governor of the World,” The US Constitutional Convention lasted until 9/17/1787, when the Constitution was endorsed, then signed and sent to the states for ratification. The Constitution lines out the form in which government is to take. This practicality is done without reference to God, but the line before the signatures carries the date “the seventeenth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty seven.” All states completed ratification by January 10th, 1791. Virtually all of the 55 signers of the US Constitution in 1787 were members of Christian denominations. The two not officially members of Christian denominations were Ben Franklin and Thomas Jefferson, both of whom had a deep faith and called for public prayer. Quotes from them reveal their trust in a providential God, and their belief in God’s providence to be critical to the foundation and ongoing success of our nation.

The Continental Congress which inspired and organized the American Revolution was entrenched in Christianity. The First Prayer in Congress, 9/6/1774 offered extemporaneously by Rev Mr. Duche began “Be Though present O God of Wisdom and direct the counsel of this Honorable Assembly…” and ended, “All this we ask in the name and through the merits of Jesus Christ, Thy Son and our Saviour, Amen.” 3/16/1776, they called for fasting and prayer ending with “throughout the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ, obtain this pardon and forgiveness.” The Congress 11/1/1777 issued the First National Proclamation of Thanksgiving to all colonies and ended it with…”that it may please God, through the merits of Jesus Christ mercifully to forgive…”

The Declaration of Independence signed July 4th, 1776 mentions in the first paragraph that It was “God” that entitled the United States to separate from Great Britain. In the first line of the second paragraph, the Declaration states that it is the “Creator” that gives us certain inalienable rights. After the list of grievances against King George, the last paragraph of the Declaration appeals to the “Supreme Judge of the World,” and “reliance on the protection of Divine Providence.”

The Articles of Confederation signed 7/9/1777 refers to the “Great Governor of the World,” The US Constitutional Convention lasted until 9/17/1787, when the Constitution was endorsed, then signed and sent to the states for ratification. The Constitution lines out the form in which government is to take, without reference to God, but the line before the signatures carries the date “the seventeenth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty seven.” All states completed ratification by January 10th, 1791. Virtually all of the 55 signers of the US Constitution in 1787 were members of Christian denominations. The two not officially members of Christian denominations were Ben Franklin and Thomas Jefferson, both of whom had a deep faith and called for public prayer Quotes from them reveal their trust in a providential God, and their belief in God’s providence to be critical to the foundation and ongoing success of our nation.

It was 80 year old Benjamin Franklin in his 6/28/1787 speech to the Constitutional Convention who said: I have lived, Sir, a long time, and the longer I live, the more convincing proofs I see of this truth—that God Governs in the affairs of men. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without His notice, is it probable that an empire can rise without His aid? We have been assured, Sir, in the Sacred Writings, that ‘expect the Lord build the House, they labor in vain that build it.” I firmly believe this; and I also believe that without his concurring aid we shall succeed in this political building no better than the Builders of Babel…I therefore beg leave to move—that henceforth prayers imploring the assistance of Heaven, and its blessing on our deliberations, be held in this Assembly every morning before we proceed to business, and that one or more of the clergy of this city be requested to officiate in that service.”

For these founders, God and liberty, God and non-tyrannical government, were inseparable. Since almost all of them were Christians who lived and breathed their faith and referred to Jesus Christ in their writings, it is honest and logical to deduce, our nation was founded on Christianity

A COWARD WHO FEARS TRUTH

Rehashing topics already well-covered is not a great use of time, but I’m nevertheless compelled to counter lies when they involve topics that disregard the power/influence and/or love of God. Hence, in response to Frederick Spoerl’s 4/19 letter to the editor about the deism of Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, in which he also stated that James Madison saw no need for religion in the government I must quote:

James Madison:
**1778: “We have staked the whole future of American civilization, not upon the power of government, far from it. We have staked the future of all our political institutions upon the capacity of mankind for self-government; upon the capacity of each and all of us to govern ourselves, to control ourselves, to sustain ourselves, according to the Ten Commandments of God.”
**11/16/1814: “The two Houses of the National Legislature having by a joint resolution expressed their desire that in the present time of public calamity and war a day may be recommended to be observed by the people of the United States as a day of public humiliation and fasting and of prayer to Almighty God for the safety and welfare of these states.”
**In a letter to Frederick Beasley 11/20/1825: “The belief in a God All Powerful wise and good, is so essential to the moral order of the World and to the happiness of man, that arguments which enforce it cannot be drawn from too many sources nor adapted with too much solicitude to the different characters and capacities to be impressed with it.”

Thomas Jefferson: (engraved on the Jefferson Memorial in Washington D.C.) “God who gave us life gave us liberty. And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are of the Gift of God? That they are not to be violated but with His wrath? Indeed, I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just; that His justice cannot sleep forever.”

Benjamin Franklin:
In a 6/28/1787 speech to the Constitutional Convention: “In this situation of this Assembly, groping as it were in the dark to find political truth, and scarce able to distinguish it when presented to us, how has it happened, Sir, that we have not hitherto once thought of humbly applying to the Father of lights to illuminate our understanding…I have lived, Sir, a long time, and the longer I live, the more convincing proofs I see of this truth—that God Governs in the affairs of men. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without His notice, is it probable that an empire can rise without His aid? We have been assured, Sir, in the Sacred Writings, that ‘expect the Lord build the House, they labor in vain that build it.” I firmly believe this; and I also believe that without his concurring aid we shall succeed in this political building no better than the Builders of Babel…I therefore beg leave to move—that henceforth prayers imploring the assistance of Heaven, and its blessing on our deliberations, be held in this Assembly every morning before we proceed to business, and that one or more of the clergy of this city be requested to officiate in that service.”

Enormous volumes exist (in valid sources like our national archives) with quotes supporting our founding Father’s belief that religion and worship of God are absolutely critical to governing a nation. While Thomas Jefferson and Ben Franklin had some aspects of their religious beliefs that were different from standard Christianity, they cannot logically be considered deists in the classic sense since deists don’t believe that God intervenes. Quotes from them reveal their trust in a providential God, and their belief in God’s providence to be critical to the foundation and ongoing success of our nation.

Mr. Spoerl flatters himself stating it takes great courage to be an atheist. The fact is, he is a coward afraid of truth. Otherwise he wouldn’t put so much effort into twisting or completely disregarding it. I have noticed his letters have been sounding progressively more agnostic than atheistic. Perhaps he is on a journey, as Thomas Paine was later in life. I hope and pray he gains the courage to face truth, heal, and come to know the forgiveness and love of God.

SEPARATION OF CHURCH AND STATE

I appreciate the article about Christian gatherings in public schools. It is a travesty of history to consider public worship of God unconstitutional. Separation of Church and State was not meant to leave God out. Writers of the constitution had seen the devastation of religious coercion and wanted to protect us from it. Judeo-Christian scripture supports voluntary yielding of a clear mind and a loving heart while coercion smacks of ignorance and pride.

A call to public worship was commonly woven into presidential speeches. To quote a few: John Adams 3/23/1798: “I do hereby recommend that Wednesday, the 9th day of May next, be observed throughout the United States as a day of solemn humiliation, fasting, and prayer.” James Madison 11/16/1814: “The two Houses of the National Legislature having by a joint resolution expressed their desire that in the present time of public calamity and war a day may be recommended to be observed by the people of the United States as a day of public humiliation and fasting and of prayer to Almighty God for the safety and welfare of these states.” Abraham Lincoln 3/30/1863: “I appoint the last Thursday in September next as a day of humiliation, prayer and fasting for all the people of the nation”.

Public worship promotes the primacy of God in our lives, and our nation is rooted in it. Overt disregard of God has similarities to human pride disguised in religion. Both have tragic consequences of epic proportions. It is a recurrent biblical theme that God’s work can be done in us and through us in proportion to our humility and love. Given the severe limitations of even the most gifted humans and given our tendency toward the pitfalls of pride, it is urgent that we encourage prayer individually, congregationally, publically, and every chance we get–if we wish to optimize the quality of our world.

SEPARATION OF CHURCH AND STATE REVISITED

I read with great interest the recent article from the Associated Press regarding the removal of monuments to the Ten Commandments from Alabama state courthouses and public schools because they were considered violations of the “Constitutions’ ban on government endorsement of religion”.

The First Amendment of our Constitution states that “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof..” It prohibits government support for an official church, like the Anglican Church in England, but it also prohibits government interference with religion. The phrase, “separation of Church and State” is considered by some to explain the religion clause of the First Amendment even though the phrase is nowhere mentioned in the Constitution.

The original use of the “separation” phrase was from an 1802 Thomas Jefferson letter responding to Connecticut Baptists who were concerned about a rumor that Jefferson was going to establish a national denomination. He assured them they need not fear; that the free exercise of religion would never be interfered with by the federal government. His “wall of separation between church and state” was to protect the church from interference by the government, not the other way around.

Separation of church and state currently means almost exactly the opposite of what it originally meant. The modern interpretation of the First Amendment has so prejudiced our way of thinking that many people don’t realize how much the Founders actually wanted the government to encourage religion, especially Christianity.

President George Washington said in his farewell speech: “Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, Religion and Morality are indispensible supports…Reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.” Washington also said, “the propitious smiles of heaven can never be expected on a nation which disregards the eternal rules of order and right which heaven itself has ordained.” John Adams, our second president asserted, “We have no government armed with power capable of contending with human passions unbridled by morality and religion…Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.”

Jefferson asked: “And can the liberties of a nation be though secure if we have lost the only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are the gift of God: That they are not to be violated with His wrath?” Jefferson believed that God, not government, was the Author and Source of rights and that the government, therefore, was to be prevented from interference of those rights.

The Supreme Court has been expanding the reach of the First Amendment and Jefferson’s “wall” metaphor to sever government from any endorsement of religious faith. Since 1971, there have been multiple rulings that violations of the First Amendment include displaying nativity scenes on public property, and praying in public schools and sports events. It is important to understand that these rulings are a distortion of the First Amendment. The men who wrote the First Amendment voted to subsidize religious groups with federal tax dollars for such activities as evangelizing the native Americans. Within a year of writing that “Separation” letter, Jefferson gave federal money to evangelize native Americans and used state funds to set up a department of Divinity at the U of Virginia and declared that students “would be expected to attend religious services.”

The current tradition of separation of church and state that restricts the freedom of religion needs to be recognized for the detestable deception that it is. We need to return the First Amendment to its original use–as a tool for restricting government interference with the freedom of religion. Used as it was originally intended, it is a protection for the right of the faithful to strengthen, encourage, and be a light to both believers and non-believers in school, in the workplace, and anywhere they find themselves. It allows them to optimize the work that faith requires of them. According to our Founding Fathers, this is essential for the very survival of this nation.

CHECK YOUR SOURCES/GET THE FACTS STRAIGHT

Another letter packed with deception gives me an opportunity to set the record straight. Francis Breidenbach’s letter, “Nation not founded on Bible”, states that Annie Bukacek “seems to feel that American civilization is going rapidly downhill and that a philosophy which she calls ‘secular humanism’ and those who promote it are largely to blame. She does not identify the ‘secular humanists’ by name or organization, except to say that they oppose the involvement of religion in government policies and activities. This she says is contrary to the beliefs of the founding fathers who based their foundation laws upon the Bible. She is wrong.”

Mr. Breidenbach mentions John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, John Hancock (“president of the Constitutional Convention”), Thomas Jefferson (“one of the chief architects of the Constitution”), James Madison (“father” of the Constitution), and George Washington.

Judge for yourself if these men believed in involving religion in government:

John Adams:
1. June 21, 1776: “Statesmen, my dear Sir, may plan and speculate for liberty, but it is Religion and Morality alone, which can establish the Principles upon which Freedom can securely stand.”
2. In his 10/11/1798 address to the military: “Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to government of any other.”
Benjamin Franklin:
1. In a 6/28/1787 speech to the Constitutional Convention: “In this situation of this Assembly, groping as it were in the dark to find political truth, and scarce able to distinguish it when presented to us, how has it happened, Sir, that we have not hitherto once thought of humbly applying to the Father of lights to illuminate our understanding…I have lived, Sir, a long time, and the longer I live, the more convincing proofs I see of this truth—that God Governs in the affairs of men. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without His notice, is it probable that an empire can rise without His aid? We have been assured, Sir, in the Sacred Writings, that ‘expect the Lord build the House, they labor in vain that build it.” I firmly believe this; and I also believe that without his concurring aid we shall succeed in this political building no better than the Builders of Babel…I therefore beg leave to move—that henceforth prayers imploring the assistance of Heaven, and its blessing on our deliberations, be held in this Assembly every morning before we proceed to business, and that one or more of the clergy of this city be requested to officiate in that service.”
John Hancock:
1. In “A Proclamation for a Day of Thanksgiving” to celebrate the conclusion of the Revolutionary
War: “The Interposition of Divine Providence in our Favor hath been most abundantly and most
graciously manifested, and the Citizens of these United States have every Reason for Praise and
Gratitude to the God of their salvation.”
Thomas Jefferson:
1. Engraved on the Jefferson Memorial in Washington D.C.: “God who gave us life gave us liberty. And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are of the Gift of God? That they are not to be violated but with His wrath? Indeed, I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just; that His justice cannot sleep forever.”
James Madison:
1. 1778: “We have staked the whole future of American civilization, not upon the power of government, far from it. We have staked the future of all our political institutions upon the capacity of mankind for self-government; upon the capacity of each and all of us to govern ourselves, to control ourselves, to sustain ourselves, according to the Ten Commandments of God.”
2. In a letter to Frederick Beasley 11/20/1825: “The belief in a God All Powerful wise and good, is so essential to the moral order of the World and to the happiness of man, that arguments which enforce it cannot be drawn from too many sources nor adapted with too much solicitude to the different characters and capacities to be impressed with it.”
George Washington
1. In his inaugural address 4/30/1789: “We ought to be no less persuaded that the propitious smiles of Heaven can never be expected on a nation that disregards the eternal rules of order and right which Heaven itself has ordained.

Enormous volumes exit with quotes supporting our founding Father’s belief that religion and worship of God are absolutely critical to governing a nation. Those who actively oppose religion’s influence on government (removing prayer from public schools, removing “In God We Trust” from our coinage, removing the Ten Commandments from government buildings, removing “One Nation Under God” from the Pledge of Allegiance, etc) often call themselves secular humanists. Those that passively accept these lies out of ignorance, I call duped. Either way, it is a poisonous philosophy, and I am in the good company of our Founding Fathers when I say it will bring destruction to a nation.

If you are an honest truth seeking secular humanist reading this, I challenge you to study original documents, not skewed versions from your own literature that support your agenda and what you want to believe.
OUR FOUNDING FATHERS WERE CHRISTIANS

The letter by Francis Breidenbach states that “There were, of course, some delegates to the Constitutional Convention in 1787 who were Christians.” He implies that they were not majority Christian. The truth is, virtually all of the 55 writers and signers of the US Constitution of 1787 were Christians including twenty seven who had gone to Christian seminary school. 29 were Anglicans, 16 to 18 were Calvinists, 2 were Methodists, 2 were Lutherans, 2 were Roman Catholics, 1 lapsed Quaker and sometimes Anglican, and 1 Deist.

Mr. Breidenbach mentions John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, John Hancock, Thomas Jefferson , James Madison, and George Washington. He says that these founding fathers of our nation had “belief in the existence of God on purely rational grounds without reliance on revealed religion or religious authority.” My last letter to the editor quoted these men, and there are many more quotes available that refute this fallacy of Mr. Breidenbach.

Thomas Jefferson did not sign the Constitution and was not present at the 1787 Convention. Though contemporaries questioned Jefferson’s Christianity due to significant doctrinal variances, he considered himself a Christian, and he promoted Christianity through acts of Congress when he was president. In a letter to Charles Thomson 1/9/1816 Mr. Jefferson wrote: “A more beautiful or precious morsel of ethics I have never seen; it is a document in proof that I am a real Christian; that is to say, a disciple of the doctrines of Jesus…Had the doctrines of Jesus been preached always as pure as they came from his lips, the whole civilized world would now have been Christians.”

Understand that these men that Mr. Breidenbach mis-represents were sophisticated learned men who knew their Bible well. Anyone that knows the writings and teachings of Jesus Christ as well as they did cannot simply accept them as rational doctrine and great recommendations for behavior. Jesus stated clearly on many occasions that He was in fact the one and only Son of God. His saying that means that there are three options for whom He was—the Son of God, a liar, or a man with psychotic delusions. It is not a rational option that Jesus was simply a great guy with a lot of wisdom and terrific ideas.

In his latest letter, Mr. Breidenbach states, “Ms. Bukacek does not refute any of the facts I recited but attempts to shift the argument…” The truth is, I sent a four page letter to the editor refuting the non-facts, and it was too long so I am having to resort to three separate letters, this being installment number two. I have no trepidation of refuting Mr. Breidenbach. It is extremely easy to refute precepts that are based on lies and irrational thought processes.

My last letter refuted Mr. Breidenbach’s proclamation that our Founding Fathers opposed involvement of religion in government and policies and activities. The quotes from the Founding Fathers speak for themselves. In this letter I refute his statement that the Founding Father’s were not majority Christians.

I cannot judge whether Mr. Breidenbach is intentionally spreading untruths (lying), or if he is simply ignorant and has been duped by the various deceptive philosophies deeply infiltrated into our media and educational system. God knows his heart and mind. I am simply setting the historical record straight.
Ben Franklin~ When asked by a Yale University student– “What is the American Religion?” (1) “God Lives!” (2) “We will see Him when we die.” (3) “He will judge us when we see Him.” (4) “That’s why we should serve Him.” (5) “The best way to serve Him, is to serve our fellow man.”

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